CPA Now Blog

A Workplace Where Employees Thrive Helps to Recruit, Engage, and Retain

Happy employees are less stressed, more productive, and, most importantly, engaged. An engaged employee will support the firm’s mission, trust management, and look for reasons to stay.

May 13, 2024, 04:21 AM

Emily FranchiBy Emily Franchi


The age-old stance, “What’s in it for me?”, is the mantra of today’s workforce, whether they be prospective candidates or long-time employees. Firms are being hard pressed to look for creative ways to both attract and retain talent.

It should go without saying that happy employees are less stressed, more productive, and, most importantly, engaged. An engaged employee will support the firm’s mission, trust management, and look for reasons to stay. Humor and laughter are just two ways to support happy employees. Smiling and laughing can be contagious, defuse conflict, and bring people together. Employees tend to follow a lead, so encourage management to incorporate “happy” into their management style. Employees who feel appreciated are happier. Firms who encourage celebrating employees are more attractive. Everyone enjoys a moment in the limelight, so shine attention on employee wins, such as bringing in a new client, passing the CPA Exam, achieving a tenure milestone, and so on. Taking time to stop and celebrate each other supports workplace happiness.

In addition to feeling happy and positive at work, employees want to know they are working for a firm that demonstrates a belief in the greater good. Studies have shown that 83% of millennials remain loyal to companies who contribute to socially responsible causes such as green energy, climate improvement, and other environmental-related causes. Firms can show their commitment to employees who support philanthropy by allowing paid time off for volunteering, hosting a firmwide fundraiser, matching an employee’s donation, or simply highlighting a nonprofit organization supported by an employee.

A survey conducted by the American Psychological Association revealed that 77% of workers reported experiencing work-related stress with symptoms ranging from emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation, and a desire to quit, to name a few. During busy seasons, firm employees often spend more time with coworkers than they do with their own family. Lines blur between work and home and co-workers and family, which means work-related stress can flood an employee’s personal life. Again, messaging starts from the top. Partners and managers must be mindful of what they do and say, and pay attention to signs of burnout. Firm-sponsored wellness programs aimed at reducing stress are plentiful and a low administrative burden. Providing a stipend to offset the cost of an employee’s health club membership, a weekly in-house yoga or mindfulness class, and firm-sponsored applications to praise employees for positive mental and physical health hygiene are just a few of initiatives that firms are incorporating into their culture to demonstrate support for an employee’s mental and physical health.

Recognizing and understanding employees’ needs begins with active listening and paying attention. Focus on the positive but be prepared to recognize the negative. Create a workplace where employees thrive, support others, and realize the value of an employer who cares about what’s important beyond the bottom line, and employee retention will flourish.


Emily Franchi is a loss prevention supervisor for employment practices at CAMICO. She provides CAMICO firms that have employment practices liability coverage with support on a variety of human resources management issues, focusing on employee relations and legislative compliance for the workplace. For any employment-related questions, feel free to send an email to lp@camico.com.


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Statements of fact and opinion are the authors’ responsibility alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of the PICPA's officers or members. The information contained herein does not constitute accounting, legal, or professional advice. For actionable advice, you must engage or consult with a qualified professional.



PICPA Staff Contributors

Disclaimer

Statements of fact and opinion are the authors’ responsibility alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of PICPA officers or members. The information contained in herein does not constitute accounting, legal, or professional advice. For professional advice, please engage or consult a qualified professional.

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